Ralph Vaughan Williams — Dona nobis pacem [Audio]

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Vaughan Williams was born on the 12th October, 1872 in the Cotswold village of Down Ampney. He was educated at Charterhouse School, then Trinity College, Cambridge. Later he was a pupil of Stanford and Parry at the Royal College of Music, after which he studied with Max Bruch in Berlin and Maurice Ravel in Paris.

At the turn of the century he was among the very first to travel into the countryside to collect folk-songs and carols from singers, notating them for future generations to enjoy. As musical editor of The English Hymnal he composed several hymns that are now world-wide favourites (For all the Saints, Come down O love Divine). Later he also helped to editThe Oxford Book of Carols, with similar success. Before the war he had met and then sustained a long and deep friendship with the composer Gustav Holst. Vaughan Williams volunteered to serve in the Field Ambulance Service in Flanders for the 1914-1918 war, during which he was deeply affected by the carnage and the loss of close friends such as the composer George Butterworth. | Read more at the RVW Society[/cs_text][/cs_column][cs_column style=”padding: 0px; ” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/3″][cs_text]LISTEN NOW
Dona nobis pacem (1936)
Beat! Beat! Drums!; Reconciliation;
Dirge for Two Veterans
Music by Ralph Vaughan Williams
Text by Walt Whitman[/cs_text][x_gap size=”50px”][x_image type=”none” src=”http://micklestreet.rutgers.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Image388.gif” alt=”” link=”true” href=”http://www.songofamerica.net/song/memories-of-lincoln” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section]